Featured, Healthy Living, Skin

How to Stick to your New SKIN Resolutions?

Why, with checklists of to-“dews”, of course!

Checklists can help us achieve objectives. This isn’t exactly a revolutionary idea. Lots of people use checklists, and have for ages. But Atul Gawande’s amazing book, The Checklist Manifest, presents comprehensive, staggering proof of the ability of this simple tool to improve outcomes in almost any situation, from flying aircraft to disaster response, construction and even for his own expert surgical team.
Always on the lookout for “skingenious” solutions to help our clients achieve their skin and health goals, we thought, why not checklists? Use these checklists of daily, monthly and annual to-”dews” — we made them in the form of wellness “coupons” that you can cut out and use as visual reminders — to help you achieve your new skin resolutions this year.
*As with all decisions regarding nutrition and exercise, seek the approval of your doctor prior to making any changes to your routine.

DAILY CHECKLISTS

REGIMEN 

Arguably the single most important tool to achieve your skin goals: a “Skinvestment Plan.”

Daily Skinvestment Plan Checklist

Daily Skinvestment Plan Checklist


Need help in creating a targeted “Skinvestment Plan?” Ask us below, on Facebook, via Ask VMV or call (212) 217 2762 for more personalized assistance.

  • Cleanse:
  • Treat & Tone:
  • Treat & Nourish:
  • Target Treat:
  • Protect:
  • Daily Prevention:

A PLOY FOR MORE JOY

Joy Checklist

Joy Checklist

  • Stop and say THANK YOU for something good in your life.
  • Spend some non-work-time with an uplifting, good-hearted person.
  • Smile at a stranger. In an elevator, in line for coffee, anywhere.
  • Do something silly. Play.
  • Tickle, cuddle, snuggle: the kids, each other, a pet.

DE-STRESS

De-Stress Checklist

De-Stress Checklist

  • Did you pray, meditate or do yoga today?
  • Did you randomly do or say something nice for/to someone?
  • Did you exercise? Endorphins are ace stress & depression busters.
  • Did you take 10 minutes just for you? TIP: curling up with a book hits the brain-building goal, too!

OVERALL HEALTH

Overall Health Checklist

Overall Health Checklist

  • EAT:
    • At least 1 full portion of raw or lightly-cooked veggies.
    • Skin-&-body beneficial oils like virgin coconut oil (try our Know-It-Oil on skin and for cooking or salad drizzling).
    • Healthier proteins like tofu, skinless chicken, lean pork and small, omega-3-rich fish (sardines, herring, etc.) instead of heavy, animal-fatty meats.
    • Substitute refined white sugar, rice, pasta and bread with whole-grain, brown and wild versions.
    • Try fresh fruit, organic peanut butter, granola, yogurt or other healthier options for dessert today.
  • WORK OUT:
    • Cardio (min. 3x-a-week). Aim for 30 continuous minutes but anything, even 10 minutes of walking in the morning and 10 minutes at night, is better than nothing.
    • Weight-bearing exercises (yoga, pilates, abdominal work, weight lifting) at least a 2x-a-week.
    • Newer studies are showing that we should be aiming for daily workouts. They don’t each have to be mega-sweat sessions. For example, alternate stronger workout like HICT (High Intensity Circuit Training) 3x-a-week with easy walks 2x-a-week: yoga or pilates 1x-a-week: and a treadmill, elliptical or cycling session 1x-a-week.
    • Alternating workouts as the additional advantage of preventing your body from getting used to a particular exercise and becoming “too efficient” (it gets easier for your body and you burn less).
  • BRAIN BUILD:
    • Spend at least 20 minutes reading a book or learning a new language or musical instrument (such activities can prevent loss of brain function as we age).
    • TIP: read on a stationary bike for a brain-body workout!
  • REST:
    • Get 7-8 hours of sleep.
  • STOP:
    • Processed or junk food (pre-packaged juice drinks, sodas, chips, candy, etc.). They’re called “junk” for good reason.
    • Smoking. There’s just no upside. None.
    • Video games or TV: limit to about an hour a day (they’re linked to numerous problems, including attention disorders, depression and heart disease).